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  • a

  • Abigail
    Flower Color: White
    Flower Fragrance: Sweet
    Flower Size: 3"
    Growing Habit: Compact (6"-12" per yr)
    Blooming: Great

  • Is considered a stress hormone. It is a signaling molecule that induces stomatal closure under drought or high temperature stress conditions.
  • The dropping of leaves, flowers, or fruit by a plant. Can result from natural growth processes or from external factors such as temperature causing dormancy or chemicals.
  • Specialized cells, usually at the base of a leaf stalk or fruit stem, that trigger both the separation of the leaf or fruit and the development of scar tissue to protect the plant.
  • The intake of water and other materials through root or leaf cells.
  • A bacterium of an order of typically nonmotile filamentous form. They include the economically important streptomycetes, and were formerly regarded as fungi.
  • The chemical in a pesticide formulation that actually kills the target pest.
  • A substance that, when added to a pesticide, reduces the surface tension between two unlike materials (e.g., spray droplets and a plant surface), thus improving adherence. Also called an adjuvant or surfactant. A substance that, when added to a pesticide, reduces the surface tension between(...)
  • The force of attraction that causes two different substances to join.
  • Growth not ordinarily expected, usually the result of stress or injury. A plant's normal growth comes from meristematic tissue, but adventitious growth starts from nonmeristematic tissue.
  • A bud that develops in locations where buds usually do not occur. An example would be buds found on root pieces used for propagation; roots do not have buds.
  • A root that forms at any place on the plant other than the primary root system.
  • The practice involving removal of cores or turf plugs and soil with the purpose of reducing compaction and improving air flow.
  • An unusual type of root that develops on stems above ground.
  • Active in the presence of free oxygen.
  • The seed maturation process that must be completed before germination can occur.
  • Soil aggregates are groups of soil particles that bind to each other more strongly than to adjacent particles. The space between the aggregates provide pore space for retention and exchange of air and water.
  • The process by which individual particles of sand, silt, and clay cluster and bind together to form soil peds.
  • The study of plants in relation to field crop production.
  • The science of crop management, including the study of soils.
  • The downward flow of air through the soil caused by gravity; also, as cold air is heavier than warm air, it flows downhill and often fills hollows which become frost pockets.
  • Used to indicate that in addition to a specific plumeria, it is "Also Know As" other names on the world market.
  • AKA indicate other known names in addition to the original plumeria name or registered name. "Also Know As" names used to market this plumeria.
  • The excretion by some plants? leaves and roots of compounds that inhibit the growth of other plants.
  • Leaves are attached at alternating points from one side of the stem to the other.
  • Active in the absence of free oxygen.
  • In landscaping, use of adjacent colors on the color wheel such as blue, violet, and red.
  • The study of plant structure.
  • Flowering plants. Plants that have a highly evolved reproductive system. Seeds enclosed in an ovary such as a fruit, grain, or pod.
  • Negatively charged ion, for example, chloride. Anion exchange.The interaction of anions on the surface of an active material with those in solution. Anion exchange capacity (AEC). The sum total of exchangeable anions that a soil can absorb expressed in meq/100g (milliequivalents per 100 grams) soil.
  • Plants started from seed that grow, mature, flower, produce seed, and die in the same growing season.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings, or are wingless, and piercing- sucking mouthparts (sucking lice).
  • The Anther is the pollen-bearing body of the stamen, flower's male sexual organ, usually relatively compact, and supported at the end of the narrow filament, together they are referred to as the stamen. Under a lens, anthers exhibit a wide variety of forms and means of attachment. These(...)
  • Plant disease characterized by black or brown dead areas on leaves, stems, or fruits.
  • A pruning tool that cuts a branch between one sharpened blade and a flat, anvil-shaped piece of metal. Has a tendency to crush rather than make a smooth cut.
  • The tip of a stem or root.
  • A bud at the tip of the stem
  • The inhibition of lateral bud growth by the presence of the hormone auxin in a plant?s terminal bud. Removing the growing tip removes auxin and promotes lateral bud break and subsequent branching, usually directly below the cut.
  • Area of the plant shoot and root tips where cells actively divide to provide more cells that will expand and develop into the tissues and organs of the plant. Also called shoot meristem.
  • Apocynaceae is a family of flowering plants that includes trees, shrubs, herbs, stem succulents, and vines, commonly called the dogbane family, after the American plant known as dogbane, Apocynum cannabinum. Members of the family are native to European, Asian, African, Australian, and American(...)
  • An area devoted to specimen plantings of trees and shrubs.
  • Direction of exposure to sunlight.
  • Building of cell matter from inorganic (minerals) and organic materials (carbohydrates and sugars).
  • A molecule that is used in a number of metabolic reactions in plant cells to carry out cellular work.
  • A material that lures pests.
  • A claw-like appendage projecting from the collar of the leaf.
  • One of the best known and most important plant hormones. Most abundantly produced in a plant?s actively growing tips. Generally stimulates growth by cell division in the tip region and by cell elongation lower down the shoot. Growth of lateral buds is strongly inhibited by the normal(...)
  • Soil water that is available for plant uptake. Excludes water bound tightly to soil particles.
  • The upper angle formed by a leaf stalk (petiole) and the internodes above it on a stem.
  • A bud occurring in the axil of a leaf.
  • b

  • A bacterium used as a biological control agent for many insects pests.
  • A single-celled, microscopic organism having a cell wall but no chlorophyllReproduces by cell division.
  • A plant dug with soil. The root ball is enclosed with burlap or a synthetic material.
  • To apply a pesticide or fertilizer in a strip over or along each crop row.
  • A plant with little or no soil around its roots; deciduous plants and small evergreens are commonly sold bare-root.
  • Fungi used in controlling organisms that attack desirable plants.
  • An insect that helps gardening efforts. May pollinate flowers, eat harmful insects or parasitize them, or break down plant material in the soil, thereby releasing its nutrients. Some insects are both harmful and beneficial. For example, butterflies can be pollinators in their adult form but(...)
  • The fleshy fruit of cane fruits, bush fruits, and strawberries.
  • Plants that take two years, or a part of two years, to complete their life cycle.
  • Producing fruit in alternate years.
  • A biological species name consisting of two names: the genus name and specific epithet.
  • The use of beneficial organisms to control pest insect populations.
  • A by-product of wastewater treatment sometimes used as a fertilizer, also known as municipal sewage sludge.
  • Darkening at the base of a stem.
  • The flat portion of the grass leaf above the sheath. Also the flattened, green portion of a leaf.
  • To exclude light from plants or parts of plants to render them white or tender. Often done to cauliflower, endive, celery, and leeks. Also used to promote adventitious root formation on stems.
  • Rapid death of leaves and other plant parts.
  • Plumeria bloom better and more as they mature and of course as the grow more tips. An average bloomer will bloom on more than 50% of the tips each year.
  • A blot or spot (usually superficial and irregular in shape) on leaves, shoots, or fruit.
  • One of the fine arts of horticulture; growing carefully trained, dwarfed plants in containers selected to harmonize with the plants. Branches are pruned and roots trimmed to create the desired effect.
  • Boron (B) is a chemical element with symbol B and atomic number 5. Because boron is produced entirely by cosmic ray spallation and not by stellar nucleosynthesis,[9] it is a low-abundance element in both the Solar system and the Earth's crust. Boron is concentrated on Earth by the(...)
  • An insecticide, such as rotenone or pyrethrum, derived from a plant. Most botanicals biodegrade quickly. Most, but not all, have low toxicity to mammals.
  • In fruits, refers to a final stage of development when the fruit is still on the plant and cell enlargement and the accumulation of carbohydrates and other flavor constituents are complete.
  • The science that studies all phases of plant life and growth.
  • A fungal disease promoted by cool, moist weather. Also known as gray mold or fruit rot.
  • A leaf-like element below a flower or on an inflorescence, Bracts are typically shaped differently than other leaves on the plant and usually small, but sometimes large and brightly colored, growing at the base of a flower or on its stalk. Clearly seen on dogwoods and poinsettias.
  • A spiny cane bush with berry fruits (e.g., raspberries and blackberries).
  • The point where a branch joins the trunk or another branch the place to make a proper pruning cut.
  • (1) To sow seed by scattering it over the soil surface. (2) To apply a pesticide or fertilizer uniformly to an entire, specific area by scattering or spraying it.
  • A non-needled evergreen.
  • Soft rot of fruit covered by gray to brown mold.
  • Plant scientists recognize two kinds of land plants, bryophytes, or nonvascular land plants and tracheophytes, or vascular land plants. Bryophytes are small, non-vascular plants, such as mosses, liverworts and hornworts. They play a vital role in regulating ecosystems because they provide an(...)
  • A small protuberance on a stem or branch, sometimes enclosed in protective scales, containing an undeveloped shoot, leaf, or flower.
  • The resumption of growth by resting buds.
  • A swollen or enlarged area where a bud was grafted to a stock.
  • First emerged leaf of a grass plant.
  • A modified leaf that forms a protective covering for a bud.
  • A shoot or twig used as a source of buds for budding.
  • The suture line where a bud or scion was grafted to a stock. Sometimes called a graft union.
  • A method of asexual plant propagation that unites one bud (attached to a small piece of bark) from the scion to the rootstock.
  • The maximum amount of either strong acid or strong base that can be added before a significant change in the pH will occur
  • A below ground stem (for example, in tulip) that is surrounded by fleshy scale like leaves that contain stored food.
  • A small bulblike organ that sometimes forms on aerial plant parts.
  • (1) An underground bulb formed in the leaf axis on a stem. (2) A tiny bulb produced at the base of a mother bulb.
  • c

  • Calcium is the chemical element with symbol Ca and atomic number 20. Calcium is a soft gray alkaline earth metal, and is the fifth-most-abundant element by mass in the Earth's crust. Calcium is also the fifth-most-abundant dissolved ion in seawater by both molarity and mass, after sodium,(...)
  • A compound found in limestone, ashes, bones, and shells; the primary component of lime.
  • Calcium carbonate is used to help prevent the spread of various diseases, such as powdery mildew, black spot, and blossom end rot. Calcium carbonate (as you may have guessed) bestows plants with a (1) healthy source of calcium, (2) pH balancing properties, (3) increases water retention ability(...)
  • Plant callus (plural calluses or calli) is a growing mass of unorganized plant parenchyma cells. In living plants, callus cells are those cells that cover a plant wound. The culture medium is supplemented with plant growth regulators, such as auxins, cytokinins, and gibberellins, to initiate(...)
  • The outer perianth of a flower. The calyx surrounds the corolla, and is typically divided into lobes called sepals. These are frequently green, and reduced relative to the petals, but they can also be large, and brightly colored, resembling petals. In many flowers, the sepals enclose and(...)
  • CAM allows plants to keep their stomata closed during the hot part of the day to prevent water loss. These plants can open their stomata at night and save the collected carbon dioxide for the next day when sunlight is available.
  • A layer of meristematic tissue that produces new phloem on the outside, new xylem on the inside, and is the origin of all secondary growth in plants. The cambium layer forms the annual ring in wood.
  • A strong, dominant rose cane with accelerated growth that originates from a bud union and explodes with many blooms.
  • On a pine tree, new terminal growth from which needles emerge.
  • The externally woody, internally pithy stem of a bramble or vine.
  • A plant lesion where part of the plant quits growing and the surrounding parts continue to grow. Sunken, discolored, dead areas on twigs or branches, usually starting from an injury, wound, or pathogen.
  • (1) The top branches and foliage of a plant. (2) The shape-producing structure of a tree or shrub.
  • The force by which water molecules bind to the surfaces of soil particles and to each other, thus holding water in fine pores against the force of gravity.
  • (1) A dense, short, compact cluster of sessile flowers, as in composite plants or clover. (2) A very dense grouping of flower buds, as in broccoli.
  • Plants take in – or 'fix' – carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis. Some of the carbon is used for plant growth, and some of it is used in respiration, where the plant breaks down sugars to get energy.
  • The organism (pathogen) that produces a given disease.
  • Disfigurement or malformation of a fruit. Fruits typically affected include tomatoes and strawberries. Catfacing is caused by insects or adverse weather during fruit development, as well as other unknown factors.
  • A structural, functional unit of a plant.
  • A complex organic substance that holds micronutrients, usually iron, in a form available for absorption by plants.
  • The use of chemicals, or insecticide, to control insect populations.
  • Chlorine has a number of benefits to plant growth. Many people make the common mistake of mixing up the plant nutrient chloride (Cl-) with the toxic form chlorine (Cl). Chloride is vital for many different plant functions, despite only being classified as a micronutrient. It is highly(...)
  • The green pigment in plants responsible for trapping light energy for photosynthesis.
  • A specialized component of certain cells. Contains chlorophyll and is responsible for photosynthesis.
  • Yellowing or whitening of normally green tissue, due to a lack of chlorophyll.
  • A reservoir, tank, or container for storing or holding water or other liquid.
  • The smallest type of soil particle (less than 0.002mm in diameter).
  • A plant that climbs on its own by twining or using gripping pads, tendrils, or some other method to attach itself to a structure or another plant. Plants that must be trained to a support are properly called trailing plants, not climbers.
  • A plastic, glass, or Plexiglas plant cover used to warm the growing environment and protect plants from frost.
  • A plant group whose members have all been derived from a single individual through constant propagation by vegetative (asexual) means, e.g., by buds, bulbs, grafts, cuttings, or laboratory tissue culture.
  • The ratio of carbon to nitrogen in organic materials. Materials with a high C:N ratio (high in carbon) are good bulking agents in compost piles, while those with a low C:N ratio (high in nitrogen) are good energy sources.
  • Cobalt (Co) is an element which is not commonly thought of by many people to play as crucial of a role in the health of a plant as it actually takes. Cobalt is one of the elements which is classified as an essential element, although it does classify as a micronutrient because of the fact that(...)
  • The sticking together of like molecules. Cohesion allows water to form drops.
  • A slow composting process that involves simply building a pile and leaving it until it decomposes. This process may take months or longer. Cold composting does not kill weed seeds or pathogens.
  • A plastic-, glass-, or Plexiglas-covered frame or box that relies on sunlight as a source of heat to warm the growing environment for tender plants.
  • A group of vegetables belonging to the cabbage family; plants of the genus Brassica, including cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, turnips, and Brussels sprouts.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings, or are wingless, and chewing mouthparts (beetles, weevils).
  • A major order of insects that are wingless and have chewing mouthparts (springtails).
  • In Mexico the common name is Cacaloxochitl or Suchitl. The name comes from nahualt and means Crow's flower.[3] The common name in Australia is 'frangipani', although 'plumeria' is used in the United States. Other common names are 'red frangipani', 'common frangipani', 'temple tree', or simply(...)
  • Pressure that squeezes soil into layers that resist root penetration and water movement. Often the result of foot or machine traffic.
  • The practice of growing two or more types of plants in combination to discourage disease and insect pests.
  • In landscaping, use of opposite colors on the color wheel such as red and green, orange and blue, and yellow and violet.
  • A fertilizer that contains all three macronutrients (N, P, K).
  • More than one bud on the same side of a node. Usually, unless growth is extremely vigorous, only one of the buds develops, and its branch may have a very sharp angle of attachment. If it is removed, a wider angled shoot usually is formed from the second (accessory) bud. Ashes and walnuts are(...)
  • Compound fertilizers, which contain N, P, and K, can often be produced by mixing straight fertilizers. In some cases, chemical reactions occur between the two or more components. For example monoammonium and diammonium phosphates, which provide plants with both N and P, are produced by(...)
  • A cone-bearing tree or shrub, usually evergreen. Pine, spruce, fir, cedar, yew, and juniper are examples.
  • A fungal fruiting structure (e.g., shelf or bracket fungi) formed on rotting woody plants.
  • A chemical that will harm a plant, when it comes into contact with green plant tissue.
  • Copper (Cu) is a chemical element with the symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. Pure copper is soft and malleable; a freshly exposed surface has a reddish-orange color. It is used as a conductor of heat(...)
  • (1) A method of espaliering fruit trees, vines, etc., to horizontal, vertical, or angled wire or wooden supports so the maximum branch surface is exposed to the sun, resulting in maximum fruit production. (2) A branch attached to such a support.
  • Leaf textures that are leather-like and tough.
  • A secondary tissue produced by the cork cambium; non living at maturity; the outer part of the periderm.
  • On woody plants, the layer of cells that produces bark, or cork, located just below the bark layers.
  • A below ground stem that is solid, swollen and covered with reduced, scale-like leaves (for example, in crocus).
  • A small, underdeveloped corm, usually attached to a larger corm.
  • The inner perianth of a flower. The corolla typically surrounds the reproductive parts of the flower. It may be continuous as in a petunia, lobed, or divided into distinct petals. In some cases, especially in cultivated varieties, the corolla may be doubled or even further multiplied,(...)
  • Found beneath the epidermis, these cells help move water from the epidermis and are active in food storage.
  • A usually flat-topped flower cluster in which the individual flower stalks grow upward from various points on the main stem to approximately the same level.
  • A seed leaf, the first leaf from a sprouting seed. Monocots have one cotyledon, dicots have two.
  • (1) A crop planted to protect the soil from erosion. (2) A crop planted to improve soil structure or organic matter content.
  • The practice of growing different types of crops in succession on the same land chiefly to preserve the productive capacity of the soil by easing insect, disease, and weed problems.
  • A specific disease caused by the bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens that causes excessive, undifferentiated growth that may girdle roots, stems, or branches.
  • To firm and pulverize (a seedbed) with a corrugated roller.
  • Cultivars are not necessarily true to type. In fact cultivar means "cultivated variety."  Therefore, a cultivar was selected and cultivated by humans. Some cultivars originate as sports or mutations on plants. Other cultivars could be hybrids of two plants. To propagate true-to-type clones,(...)
  • In turf, the working of the soil without the destruction of the turf.
  • Controlling an insect population by maintaining good plant health and by crop rotation and/or companion crops.
  • Rolling and curling of leaves at the growing point. May indicate a viral infection.
  • One of several forms of asexual propagation.
  • A flower stalk on which the florets start blooming from the top of the stem and progress toward the bottom.
  • The swollen, egg-containing female body of certain nematodes. Can sometimes be seen on the outside of infected roots.
  • A class of plant hormones that promotes cell division, among other effects.
  • A class of plant growth substances (phytohormones) that promote cell division, or cytokinesis, in plant roots and shoots and they promote the growth of buds.
  • d

  • Thai word for Red. Dang
  • Thai word for Star
  • To remove individual, spent flowers from a plant for the purpose of preventing senescence and prolonging blooming. For effective results, the ovary behind the flower must be removed as well.
  • A plant that sheds all of its leaves annually.
  • The microorganisms and invertebrates that accomplish composting.
  • The breakdown of organic materials by microorganisms.
  • A drastic method of pruning a neglected tree or shrub. Entails the removal of large branches, especially high in the crown, a few at a time over several seasons.
  • Causing damage or loss.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings, or are wingless, and have mouthparts (earwigs).
  • Excessive dryness or loss of moisture resulting in drying out the plant tissues.
  • In determinate inflorescences, the youngest flowers are at the bottom of an elongated axis or on the outside of a truncated axis. A terminal bud forms a terminal flower and then dies out, stopping the growth of the axis. The other flowers then grow from lateral buds below it.
  • To remove thatch (a tightly intermingled layer of stems and roots, living and dead, that forms between the soil surface and green vegetation of grass).
  • The opposite of invigorating- to give vigor to, fill with life and energy, energize.
  • The fossilized remains of diatoms (a type of tiny algae) used to kill insect pests, snails, and slugs.
  • Plants with two seed leaves. Also referred to as dicot.
  • Progressive death of shoots, branches, or roots, generally starting at the tips.
  • A change in composition, structure, and function of cells and tissues during growth.
  • Plants that have male and female flowers occurring on separate plants (e.g., holly).
  • A major order of insects that have one pair of wings and sucking or siphoning mouthparts as adults and chewing mouthparts as larvae (mosquitoes, flies, and gnats).
  • Planting seeds into garden soil rather than using transplants.
  • Twisted or misformed growth.
  • Active during the day.
  • Deoxyribonucleic acid is the genetic information that dictates all cellular processes. DNA is organized into chromosomes and is responsible for all characteristics of the plant.
  • Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a molecule that encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms and many viruses. DNA is a nucleic acid; alongside proteins and carbohydrates, nucleic acids compose the three major macromolecules essential(...)
  • An annual period which causes the resting stage of a plant or ripe seeds during which nearly all manifestations of life come to an almost complete stand still.
  • Resting or not growing. A deciduous tree is dormant in the winter.
  • A bud formed during a growing season that remains at rest during the following winter or dry season. If it does not expand during the following growing season, it is termed latent.
  • An oil applied during the dormant season to control insect pests and diseases.
  • A flower with more than the normal number of petals, sepals, bracts, or florets. May be designated botanically by the terms flore pleno, plena or pleniflora.
  • Grafted twice, i.e., grafted to an intermediate stock.
  • Leaf textures that are covered with very short, weak, and soft hairs.
  • Known best by its common name, downy mildew is caused by the oomycete. It is an obligate parasite of vascular plants, meaning that it cannot survive outside of a living host. It does not produce overwintering oospores, but survives from year to year on living plants. These organisms are(...)
  • Tiles installed in the ground acts as a piping system to collect and redirect subsurface water that moves down into and through the soil.
  • The ability of soil to transmit water through the surface and subsoil.
  • Restricted plant size without loss of health and vigor.
  • e

  • The study of the complex relationships of plants in biological communities.
  • The level at which pest damage justifies the cost of control. In home gardening, the threshold may be aesthetic rather than economic.
  • Plumeria leaves having the form of an ellipse.
  • Hardened opaque outer wings of a beetle.
  • The tiny plant that is formed inside a seed during fertilization. It has two growing points, the radicle (a tiny root) and the plumule (a tiny shoot).
  • Common in seed of woody perennial plants. A physiological condition in the embryo that prevents it from growing. This type of dormancy can be overcome by stratification.
  • Epidermal outgrowths on leaves or stems.
  • Belonging exclusively or confined to a particular place.
  • The internal body support found in most animals outside of the insect kingdom.
  • The tissue surrounding the embryo of flowering plant seeds that provides nutrition to the developing embryo, or the food-storage area in a seed for the growing embryo.
  • A biological catalyst that aids in conversion of food and other chemical structures from one form to another.
  • A widespread and severe outbreak of a disease.
  • The outer cell layers on the top and bottom of the leaf.
  • The cells that protect the root surface. The epidermis contains the root hairs and is responsible for the absorption of water and minerals dissolved in water.
  • In non-woody plants, the outer single layer of surface cells that protect the stem. As in leaves, this layer is usually cutinized, or waxy, and on young stems it has stomata.
  • An abnormal downward-curving growth or movement of a leaf, leaf part or stem.
  • Caneberries that have arching, self-supporting canes.
  • The training of tree or shrub to grow flat on a trellis or wall. Espalier patterns may be very precise and formal or more natural and informal.
  • Is the only hormone that is a gas. It speeds aging of tissues and enhances fruit ripening.
  • Long internodes and pale green color of plants growing under insufficient light or in complete darkness.
  • A plant that never loses all its foliage at the same time.
  • To remove or extract, as an embryo from a seed or ovule.
  • A tree form in which the main trunk remains dominant with small more or less horizontal branches. Fir and sweetgum are examples.
  • Peeling off in shreds or thin layers, as in bark from a tree.
  • Of foreign origin or character; not native; introduced from abroad, but not fully naturalized
  • f

  • To keep land unplanted during one or more growing seasons.
  • A sub-order in the classification of plants.
  • (of a tree or shrub) having the branches sloping upward more or less parallel to the main stem
  • The presence of minerals necessary for plant life.
  • Fertilization is 1. The fusion of male and female germ cells following pollination. 2. The addition of plant nutrients to the environment around a plant.
  • Any substance added to the soil (or sprayed on plants) to supply those elements required in plant nutrition.
  • The amount of nitrogen, phosphorus (as P2O5), and potassium (as K2O) in a fertilizer expressed as a percentage of total fertilizer weight. Nitrogen (N) is always listed first, phosphorus (P) second, and potassium (K) third.
  • The smallest whole number relationship among N, P2O5, and K2O.
  • The distribution pattern of the disease over all plants of the same species.
  • The Filament is usually narrow and often threadlike part of the stamen which supports the pollen-bearing anther.
  • Loss of turgor and drooping of plant parts, usually as a result of water stress. Can be seen as branch loss in a tree.
  • Covers, usually of a cloth-like material, placed over growing plants and used to protect the plants growing beneath from undesirable pests and climate.
  • Second-year growth of cane berries. Produces fruit on laterals.
  • Plumeria introduced and Plumeria grown from seed by Florida Colors Nursery
  • Florida Colors Nursery is located at  23740 SW 147th Ave Homestead, FL 33032. 305.258.1086 Visit them online at www.floridacolorsplumeria.com
  • Plumeria flowers have five petals, although flowers with four, six, seven or more petals are not uncommon. Some types of flowers do not fully open and are referred to as shell, semi-shell, or tulip like. Most flowers have a strong pleasant fragrance that is most intense during the early part(...)
  • A type of bud that produces one or more flowers.
  • Colors of Plumeria Flower range from white to dark maroon. The most common is white with a yellow center. Caution there are no blue plumeria.
  • The average of a Plumeria flowers is 3", with sizes ranging from 2" to 6", a few may even be smaller or larger.
  • Foliar fertilizers are applied directly to leaves. The method is almost invariably used to apply water-soluble straight nitrogen fertilizers and used especially for high value crops such as fruits.
  • Fertilization of a plant by applying diluted soluble fertilizer, such as fish emulsion or kelp, directly to the leaves.
  • A dry, dehiscent, one- carpel led fruit with usually having more than one seed and opening along the ventral structure.
  • Fool's Gold JJ Thai,
  • A unit of measure of the intensity of light falling on a surface, equal to one lumen per square foot and originallydefined with reference to a standardized candle burning at one foot from a given surface.
  • To bring a plant into early growth, generally by raising the temperature or transplanting it to a warmer situation. Tulips and paper whites are examples of plants that often are forced.
  • (1) A naturally occurring characteristic different from other plants in the same population. (2) The growth habit (shape) of a plant.
  • (1) A garden that is laid out in precise symmetrical patterns. (2) A flower, such as some camellias, that consists of layers of regularly overlapping petals.
  • WHAT IS THE TRUE PLUMERIA FRAGRANCE?  In the proof-reading phases of the University of Hawaii's Plumeria Cultivars in Hawaii bulletin 158, the editor disagreed with the authors on the nature of the fragrance of several of the plumeria cultivars. It brought to mind the differences that people(...)
  • Frangipani, Any of the shrubs or small trees that make up the genus Plumeria, in the dogbane family, native to the New World tropics and widely cultivated as ornamentals; also, a perfume derived from or imitating the odour of the flower of one species, P. rubra. The white-edged, yellow flowers(...)
  • the excrement of insect larvae
  • Specifically, the foliage of ferns, but often applied to any foliage that looks fernlike, such as palm leaves.
  • The enlarged ovary that develops after fertilization occurs.
  • The location and manner in which fruit is borne on woody plants.
  • The application of a toxic gas or other volatile substance to disinfect soil or a container, such as a grain bin.
  • A compound toxic to fungi.
  • A plant organism that lacks chlorophyll, reproduces via spores, and usually has filamentous growth. Examples are molds, yeasts, and mushrooms.
  • g

  • A growth on plant stems or leaves caused by abnormal cell growth stimulated by the feeding of some insects (e.g., aphids) or by viral, fungal, or bacterial infection or genetic abnormality.
  • A plant or animal that has had genetic material introduced to its genome from other organisms through artificial means.
  • A subdivision of family in the classification of plants. Plants of the same genus share similarities mostly in flower characteristics and genetics. Plants in one genus usually cannot breed with plants of another genus.
  • The study of the distribution of plants throughout the world.
  • The processes that begin after planting a seed that lead to the growth of a new plant.
  • Are plant hormones that regulate growth and influence various developmental processes, including stem elongation, germination, dormancy, flowering, sex expression, enzyme induction, and leaf and fruit senescence.
  • The damaging, cutting, removing, or clamping of cambium all the way around a trunk or branch. Sometimes, girdling is done deliberately to kill an unwanted tree, but often it results from feeding by insects or rodents. Wires and ties used to support a tree can cause girdling, as can string trimmers.
  • A root system that has outgrown its pot to the extent that the roots are encircling the inside of the pot, restricting nutrient uptake.
  • From a woody stem, the removal of a ring of bark extending inward to the cambium.
  • Leaf textures that are hairless, but not necessarily smooth.
  • Covered with a grayish, bluish, or whitish waxy coating that is easily rubbed off. Blue spruce needles are an example of glaucous leaves.
  • The placement of a scion (part of a branch containing buds) onto a growing root stock to produce a plant of a known variety.
  • A method of asexual plant propagation that joins plant parts so they will grow as one plant.
  • An enclosed composting unit often used for composting food waste.
  • An herbaceous crop plowed under while green to enrich the soil.
  • The color of a fruit before it ripens.
  • Plants used for holding soil, controlling weeds, and providing leaf texture.
  • The period between the beginning of growth in the spring and the cessation of growth in the fall.
  • The pore is bordered by a pair of specialized parenchyma cells known as guard cells that are responsible for regulating the size of the opening. They swell to open the stoma and shrink to close it.
  • Plants that have seed not enclosed in an ovary (e.g., conifers).
  • h

  • The growth, shape and form of a plant.
  • (of plants) able to withstand some cold damp weather but will be damaged by frost.
  • Modified hind wings that are reduced in size and used for stabilization during flight.
  • (1) The process of gradually exposing seedlings started indoors to outdoor conditions before transplanting. (2) The process of gradual preparation for winter weather.
  • An impervious layer of soil or rock that prevents root growth and downward drainage of water.
  • Frost or freeze tolerant. In horticulture, this term does not mean tough or resistant to insect pests or disease.
  • An implement consisting of a heavy frame set with teeth or tines that is dragged over plowed land to break up clods, remove weeds, and cover seed.
  • (1) To cut off part of a shoot or limb rather than remove it completely at a branch point. (2) The part of a tree from which the main scaffold limbs originate.
  • The central cylinder, often dark colored, of xylem tissue in a woody stem.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings and piercing-sucking mouthparts (bed bugs, stink bugs, cinch bugs).
  • A soft, pliable, usually barkless shoot or plant. Distinct from stiff, woody growth.
  • A chemical used to kill undesirable plants.
  • Leaf textures that are pubescent with coarse, stiff hairs.
  • Leaf textures that are rough with bristles, stiff hairs, or minute prickles.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings, or are wingless, and piercing- sucking mouthparts (aphids, leafhoppers, scales, mealybugs).
  • A sticky substance excreted by aphids and some other insects.
  • An oil made from petroleum products, vegetable oil, or fish oil used to control insect pests and diseases. Oils work by smothering insects and their eggs and by protectively coating buds against pathogen entry.
  • The science of growing fruits, vegetables, flowers, and other ornamental plants.
  • A plant on which an insect or disease completes all or part of its life cycle.
  • A plant that is invaded by a parasite.
  • The various plants that may be attacked by a parasite.
  • A fast composting process that produces finished compost in 4 to 8 weeks. High temperatures are maintained by mixing balanced volumes of energy materials and bulking agents, by keeping the pile moist, and by turning it frequently to keep it aerated.
  • An enclosed bed for propagating or protecting plants. Has a source of heat to supplement solar energy.
  • Decomposing organic matter in the soil.
  • The results of a cross between two different species or well-marked varieties within a species. Hybrids grown in a garden situation will not breed true to form from their own seed.

  • A modified pore, especially on a leaf, that exudes drops of water.
  • When they photosynthesise, plants use sunlight to break apart water into hydrogen and oxygen, and then combine the resulting hydrogen with carbon dioxide from the air to create carbohydrates.
  • Having little or no affinity for water.
  • A method of growing plants without soil. Plants usually are suspended in water or polymers, and plant nutrients are supplied in dilute solutions.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings, or are wingless, and chew-ing mouthparts (wasps, bees, ants, sawflies).
  • The seedling stem that develops below the cotyledons.
  • i

  • The portion of the germination process that involves the absorption of water, causing the seed to swell, and that triggers cell enzyme activity, growth, and the bursting of the seed coat.
  • (chemical) or; IAA. A naturally occurring auxin, a kind of plant hormone.
  • The movement of water into soil.
  • Inflorescence refers to the flowering body of a plant. These occur in an amazing variety of forms, from solitary flowers to enormously complex clusters, and there is an equally amazing variety of technical terminology used to describe them. Unfortunately, as with some other aspects of botany,(...)
  • A group of individual flowers. The grouping can take many forms, such as a spike (flowers closely packed along a vertical stem, e.g., snapdragons), an umbel or corymb (flowers forming a flattened dome, e.g., yarrow), a panicle (a complex hierarchical arrangement of flowers, e.g., hydrangeas),(...)
  • Any part of the pathogen that can cause infection.
  • Being or composed of matter other than plant or animal.
  • A plant that attracts beneficial insects.
  • A chemical used to control, repel, suppress, or kill insects.
  • An approach that attempts to use several or all available methods for control of a pest or disease.
  • The area of the stem that is between the nodes.
  • The middle piece of a graft combination made up of more than two parts, i.e., the piece between the scion and the rootstock. Often has a dwarfing effect.
  • Iron (Fe) fertilization is the intentional introduction of iron to the upper ocean to stimulate a phytoplankton bloom. This is intended to enhance biological productivity, which can benefit the marine food chain and is under investigation in hopes of increasing carbon dioxide removal from the(...)
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings, or are wingless, and chewing mouthparts (termites).
  • j

  • A node; the place on a stem where a bud, leaf, or branch forms.
  • k

  • A tool for plant or animal classification and identification. Consists of a series of paired statements that move from general to specific descriptions.
  • A tool for plant classification and identification. Consists of a series of paired statements that move from general to specific descriptions.
  • Thai word for White
  • l

  • Lance-shaped, several times longer than broad and widest below the middle, tapering with convex sides upward to the apex.
  • (larvae is plural) The immature form of an insect that undergoes complete metamorphosis. Different from the adult in form, a caterpillar for example. The newly hatched, wingless, often wormlike form of many insects before metamorphosis.
  • An undeveloped shoot or flower that is found at the node. Also called the axillary bud.
  • Cylinders of actively dividing cells that start just below the apical meristem and are located up and down the plant. Also called the vascular cambium.
  • Plumeria Latex as found in nature is a milky fluid also found in 10% of all flowering plants (angiosperms). It is a complex emulsion consisting of proteins, alkaloids, starches, sugars, oils, tannins, resins, and gums that coagulate on exposure to air.Latex is usually exuded after tissue(...)
  • A method of stimulating adventitious roots to form on a stem. There are two primary methods of layering. In ground layering, a low-growing branch is bent to the ground and covered by soil. In air layering, moist rooting medium is wrapped around a node on an above-ground stem.
  • A liquid that has passed through unprocessed organic material. Leachate may contain pathogens, phytotoxins and anaerobic microorganisms that could be harmful to plants.
  • Movement of water and soluble nutrients down through the soil profile.
  • The area between the leaf or petiole and the stem.
  • Rolling and curling of leaves.
  • A visible, thickened crescent or line on a stem where a leaf was attached.
  • Damage to a leaf, due to adverse environmental conditions such as high temperatures, that causes rapid water loss resulting in dead tissue.
  • A single division of a compound leaf
  • A small opening on the surface of fruits, stems, and roots that allows exchange of gases between internal tissues and the atmosphere.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings and sucking or siphoning mouth-parts as adults and chewing mouthparts as larvae (moths, butterflies).
  • Lilac Mist A Medium tree. Lilac-pink, beautifully veined, 3.5"-4??". PSA Registration: Color: Lilac Pink Flower Size: 4" Blooming: Great Bloomer Growth: Medium Scent: Lilac AKAs: Notes:
  • A rock powder consisting primarily of calcium carbonate. Used to raise soil pH (decrease acidity).
  • Any plant that is used to cover an area of soil and adds nutrients, enhances soil porosity, decreases weeds and prevents soil erosion.
  • A soil with roughly equal proportions of sand, silt, and clay particles.
  • Thai word for Yellow
  • m

  • Collectively, primary and secondary nutrients.
  • All essential elements are by definition required for plant growth and completion of the plant life cycle from seed to seed. Some essential elements are needed in large quantities and others in much smaller quantities. However, from a practical standpoint, three of the six essential(...)
  • Magnesium is a chemical element with the symbol Mg and atomic number 12. Its common oxidation number is +2. It is an alkaline earth metal and the eighth-most-abundant element in the Earth's crust and ninth in the known universe as a whole. Magnesium is the fourth-most-common element in the(...)
  • A major order of insects that are wingless and have chewing mouthparts (chewing lice).
  • The first pair of jaws on insects: stout and tooth like in chewing insects, needle or sword-shaped in sucking insects. The lateral (left and right) upper jaws of biting insects.
  • Manganese (Mn) is a chemical element, designated by the symbol Mn. It has the atomic number 25. It is not found as a free element in nature; it is often found in combination with iron, and in many minerals. Manganese is a metal with important industrial metal alloy uses, particularly in(...)
  • Plant tissue in the process of formation; vegetative cells in a state of active division and growth, e.g., those at the apex of growing stems and roots and responsible for enlarging stem diameter.
  • In between the epidermis layers, where photosynthesis occurs.
  • Climate affected by landscape, structures, or other unique factors in a particular immediate area.
  • A nutrient, usually in the parts per million range, used by plants in small amounts, less than 1 part per million (boron, chlorine, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, zinc, and nickel).
  •  The majority of the micronutrients are not mobile in the plant. Deficiency symptoms are usually found on new growth. Their availability in the soil is highly dependent upon the pH and the presence of other ions. The proper balance between the ions present is important as many micronutrients(...)
  • A fertilizer that contains at least two of the three macronutrients (N, P, K).
  • Molybdenum (Mo) is a Group 6 chemical element with the symbol Mo and atomic number 42. The name is from Neo-Latin Molybdaenum, from Ancient Greek molybdos, meaning lead, since its ores were confused with lead ores. Molybdenum minerals have been known into prehistory, but the element was(...)
  • Plants that have imperfect flowers (male and female) occurring on the same plant (e.g., corn).
  • Vascular plants with monopodial growth habits grow upward from a single point. They add leaves to the apex each year and the stem grows longer accordingly. The word Monopodial is derived from Greek "mono-", one and "podial", "foot", in reference to the fact that monopodial plants have a single(...)
  • The study of the origin and function of plant parts.
  • Non-uniform foliage coloration with a more or less distinct intermingling of normal green and light green or yellowish patches.
  • An irregular pattern of light and dark areas.
  • Thai word for Purple
  • Any material placed on the soil surface to conserve soil moisture, moderate soil temperature, and/or control weeds. Wood chips, bark chips, and shredded leaves are mulches that eventually add organic matter to the soil; inorganic materials such as rocks are also used.
  • A genetic change within an organism or its parts that changes its characteristics. Also called a bud sport or sport.
  • The study of fungi.
  • Beneficial fungi that infect plant roots and increase their ability to take up nutrients from the soil.
  • n

  • Acronym for the three major plant nutrients contained in manure, compost, and fertilizers. N stand for nitrogen, P for phosphorus, and K for potassium.
  • Death of cells resulting in necrotic or dead tissue.
  • A material that kills or protects against nematodes.
  • Microscopic roundworms that live in soil and living tissue, as well as water, and survive as eggs or cysts.
  • Nickel (Ni) was not considered an important element for plant growth, but now research has concluded that it is an essential element for plant growth. The normal range for nickel in most plant tissue is between 0.05-5 ppm. Due to its low requirements (often in parts per billion), it is found(...)
  • A microbe that converts ammonium to nitrate.
  • A primary plant nutrient, especially important for foliage and stem growth.
  • The sequence of biochemical changes undergone by nitrogen as it moves from living organisms, to decomposing organic matter, to inorganic forms, and back to living organisms.
  • The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into plant-available forms by rhizobia bacteria living on the roots of legumes.
  • Active at night.
  • The area of the stem that bears a leaf or a branch. A joint where leaves, roots, branches, or stems arise.
  • An abbreviation indicating a plumeria's name has No Identification.
  • The assigning of names in the classification of plants.
  • A pesticide that kills most plants or animals.
  • Not alive; nonviable seeds may look normal but will not grow.
  • NPK fertilizers are three-component fertilizers. They provide sources of potassium as well as nitrogen and phosphorus. Such NPK fertilizers are 70-75% soluble in water.NPK rating is a government mandated rating system describing the amount of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. NPK ratings(...)
  • The organelle within a cell that contains chromosomes and thus controls various cellular processes, including division into new cells.
  • o

  •  Obanceolate leaves are significantly longer than wide and widest above the middle, gradually widening toward the apexOblanceolate (of a leaf shape) having a broad rounded apex and a tapering base. Katie Moragne has Obanceolate leaves.
  • Broader below rather than below the middle. The shape of an inverted egg.
  • Blunt, rounded leaf tip.
  • A new shoot that forms at the base of a plant or in a leaf axil.
  • Seed produced from natural, random pollination so that the resulting plants are varied.
  • Two leaves are attached at the same point on the stem, but on opposite sides.
  • A structure within a cell, such as a chloroplast, or mitochondria that performs a specific function.
  • (1) Relating to, derived from, or involving the use of food produced with the use of feed or fertilizer of plant or animal origin without employment of synthetically formulated fertilizers, growth stimulants, antibiotics, or pesticides. (2) Being or composed of plant or animal matter. (3) A(...)
  • A natural fertilizer material that has undergone little or no processing. Can include plant, animal, and/or mineral materials.
  • The main "organic fertilizers" are, in ranked order, peat, animal wastes, plant wastes from agriculture, and sewage sludge. In terms of volume, peat is the most widely used organic fertilizer. This immature form of coal confers no nutritional value to the plants, but improves the soil by(...)
  • Any material originating from a living organism (peat moss, plant residue, compost, ground bark, manure, etc.).
  • Pesticides derived from plant or animal sources.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings, or are wingless, and chewing mouthparts (grasshoppers, crickets, and cockroaches).
  • Passage of materials through a membrane from an area of high concentration to an area of lower concentration.
  • The protective outer shell for the seed.
  • The part of the pistil that encloses the unfertilized seeds or ovules, and that typically develops into a dry or fleshy fruit once pollination takes place. The ovary is generally central to the flower, and supports the other principle parts. Whether they are attached at the top (ovary(...)
  • Within the ovary, a tissue/structure that will develop into a seed after fertilization.
  • The chemical process by which sugars and starches are converted to energy. In plants, known as respiration.
  • p

  • A leaf whose veins radiate outward from a single point somewhat like the fingers of a hand.
  • Pandurate (of leaf shape) having rounded ends and a contracted center. Fiddle-shaped; obovate with a pair of well developed basil lobes.
  • An organism that lives in or on another organism (host) and derives its food from the latter.
  • Any organism that can cause a disease.
  • The study of plant diseases.
  • A cluster of individual soil particles.
  • The footstalk supporting a single flower in an inflorescence.
  • The main stem supporting an inflorescence (as opposed to a pedicel, which is the stem of an individual flower).
  • Penang Peach aka Som Garasin (close), Thai Gold, Thai Yellow, Thai Salmon, California Sunset (close), Som Kalisin, Orange Thai (close). Malaysia Thick petals, good heavy bloomer. Orange with red bands and stiff texture. Compact low spreading growth. Leaf has a hook at the tip. Red leaf(...)
  • More or less hanging or declined.
  • Color(s): White with Pink Flower Size: 3" Blooming: Great Bloomer Growth: Medium Scent: Classic Frangipani History: Florida Colors Nursery seedling
  • A plant that lives more than two years and produces new foliage, flowers, and seeds each growing season.
  • Collectively, sepals and petals form the perianth. The technical term for the envelope that surrounds the reproductive parts of a flower. This enclosure is composed of two concentric units, the outer perianth, or calyx which may be divided into sepals, and the inner perianth, or corolla, which(...)
  • The point at which a wilted plant can no longer recover.
  • The rate at which water moves through a soil.
  • Highly colored portions of the flower, inside the sepals, that protect the inner reproductive structures. Often attract insects with their color or may contain osmophores which are scent structures both of which facilitate pollination. A division or lobe of the corolla or inner perianth of a flower.
  • The stalk that joins a leaf to a stem; leafstalk.
  • The acidity or alkalinity of a solution on a scale of 0-14, with a value of 7 signifying neutral, values below 7 signifying acidic, and values above 7 signifying alkaline. Relates to the concentrations of hydrogen (H+) ions in the soil. pH values are logarithmic.
  • Herbicides work to mimimic IAA or auxin in broadleaf plants causing uncontrolled growth and eventual death.
  • A vapor or liquid emitted by an insect that causes a specific response from a receiving insect. Some pheromones are used to find a mate. Synthetic pheromones are used as attractants in insect traps.
  • Thai word for Diamond, Pet Petch
  • The principle nutrient-conducting structure of vascular plants.
  • The form of phosphorus listed in most fertilizer analyses.
  • Phosphorus is a nonmetallic chemical element with symbol P and atomic number 15. A multivalent pnictogen, phosphorus as a mineral is almost always present in its maximally oxidised state, as inorganic phosphate rocks. Elemental phosphorus exists in two major forms
  • Phosphorus is a primary plant macronutrient, especially important for flower production. In fertilizer, usually expressed as phosphate.
  • The amount of time a plant is exposed to light.
  • Plant responses to light and dark periods that induce certain physiological reactions.
  • A food product (sugar or starch) created through photosynthesis.
  • (1) The process in which green plants convert light energy from the sun into chemical energy in order to produce carbohydrates. (2) Formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (as water) in the chlorophyll-containing tissues of plants exposed to light.
  • The phenomenon of plants growing toward the direction of a light source.
  • Thai word for Cluster
  • The study dealing with the functioning of plants, their mechanisms of response, and their physical and biochemical processes.
  • Toxic to a plant.
  • A pattern of flower petal coloration in which the edges of the petal are in a color that contrasts with the flower body.
  • Finely ground pine mulch also sold as a soil conditioner. A byproduct of the bark mulch industry, pine fines are too small to be sold as bark mulch, but make an excellent mulch for flower beds and container plantings (direct-seeded annual flowers can still push up through) and an excellent(...)
  • An arrangement of leaflets attached laterally along the rachis of a compound leaf.
  • A leaf shape cleft nearly to the midrib in broad divisions not separated into distinct leaflets.
  • The seed-bearing or "female" reproductive part of a flower. The pistil is composed of the ovary, the style, and the stigma. The ovary contains the developing seeds, and is connected to the pollen-receiving stigma by the style. Flowers often contain a single pistil, but may contain several.(...)
  • The scientific grouping and naming of plants by characteristics.
  • The study of diseases in plants: what causes them, what factors influence their development and spread, and how to prevent or control them.
  • Plumeria (/pluːˈmɛriə/; common name plumeria) is a genus of flowering plants in the dogbane family, Apocynaceae. It contains primarily deciduous shrubs and small trees. The flowers are native to Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean, and South America as far south as Brazil but can be grown(...)
  • Plumeria alba is a species of the genus Plumeria (Apocynaceae). This 2-8m evergreen shrub has narrow elongated leaves, large and strongly perfumed white flowers with a yellow center. Native to Central America and the Caribbean, it is now common and naturalized in southern and southeastern Asia.
  • Plumeria.Care is an informational website designed to make it easy to find plumeria related information.
  • Plumeria clusioides is a species of the genus Plumeria the the family Apocynaceae. It is endemic to the Island of Cuba. Some authors consider P. clusioides to be the same species as P. obtusa, but we follow the lead of the World Checklist produced by Kew Royal Gardens in London in accepting it(...)
  • The Plumeria Database, managed by plumeria enthusiasts, provides standardized information about plumeria worldwide. It includes names, species and cultivars abstracts, characteristics, images, care information, references, and web links. This information primarily(...)
  • Plumeria dormancy is a period of arrested growth. It is a survival strategy exhibited by many plant species, which enables them to survive in climates where part of the year is unsuitable for growth. Plumerias are tropical and a phase of innate dormancy coinciding with an unfavorable(...)
  • Plumeria obtusa is a species of the genus Plumeria (Apocynaceae). It is native to West Indies including Bahamas; southern Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, and Florida. Widely cultivated for its ornamental and fragrant flowers around the world, where suitably warm climate exists. It is reportedly(...)
  • Plumeria pudica is a species of the genus Plumeria (Apocynaceae), native to Panama, Colombia and Venezuela. This profuse bloomer has unusual spoon-shaped leaves, and its flowers are white with a yellow center.There is a variegated leaved Plumeria pudica commonly called Golden Arrow or Gilded(...)
  • Plumeria rubra is a deciduous plant species belonging to the genus Plumeria. Originally native to Mexico, Central America, Colombia and Venezuela, it has been widely cultivated in subtropical and tropical climates worldwide and is a popular garden and park plant, as well as being used in(...)
  • The plumeria is more appropriately considered a tree. In the tropics it can grow to heights over thirty feet. A mature plumeria has very strong hardwood and can be safely climbed by the average person so long as the limbs are at least three inches in diameter. Remember to keep your weight(...)
  • The shoot portion of an embryo.
  • A method of tree pruning that involves heading back severely to main branches each year so as to produce a thick, close growth of young branches.
  • A slender tube growing from the pollen grain that carries the male gametes and delivers them to the ovary.
  • Pollination is the first step in fertilization; the transfer of pollen from anther to a stigma.
  • An agent such as an insect that transfers pollen from a male anther to a female stigma.
  • The spaces within a rock body or soil that are unoccupied by solid material.
  • The form of potassium listed in most fertilizer analyses.
  • Potassium is a chemical element with symbol K (derived from Neo-Latin kalium) and atomic number 19. Elemental potassium is a soft silvery-white alkali metal that oxidizes rapidly in air and is very reactive with water, generating sufficient heat to ignite the hydrogen emitted in the reaction(...)
  • A primary plant nutrient, especially important for developing strong roots and stems. In fertilizers, usually expressed as potash.
  • Fine, white to gray, powdery fungal coating on leaves, stems, and flowers.
  • An animal that eats another animal.
  • A product applied before crops or weeds emerge from the soil.
  • Growth that occurs via cell division at the tips of stems and roots.
  • A nutrient required by plants in a relatively large amount (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium).
  • A fertilizer that is manufactured or refined from natural ingredients to be more concentrated and more available to plants.
  • To start new plants by seeding, budding, grafting, dividing, etc.
  • Plumeria Propagation: The vast majority of plumeria are populated by seeds or cuttings.Plant propagation is the process of creating new plants from many sources: seeds, cuttings and other plant parts. Plant propagation can also refer to the artificial or natural dispersal of plants.
  • Any structure capable of being propagated or acting as an agent of reproduction.
  • A major order of insects that have two pairs of wings, or are wingless, and chewing mouthparts (barklice, booklice).
  • Leaf textures that are hairy.
  • The stage between larva and adult in insects that go through complete metamorphosis.
  • An insect in the non-feeding stage between the larva and adult, during which it typically undergoes complete transformation within a protective cocoon or hardened case. Only insects that undergo complete metamorphosis have pupal stages.
  • q

  • A fertilizer that contains nutrients in plant-available forms such as ammonium and nitrate. Fertilizer is readily soluble in water.
  • In a state or period of inactivity or dormancy.
  • r

  • A flower stalk on which the florets start blooming from the bottom of the stem and progress toward the top.
  • The rachis is the midrib of a leaf. It is usually continuous with the petiole and is often raised above the lamina or leaf blade. On a compound leaf, the rachis extends from the first set of leaflets (where the petiole ends) to the end of the leaf. The stem of a plant, especially a grass,(...)
  • The horizontal spacing of branches around a trunk.
  • The root portion of an embryo.
  • The base of the flower stalk that holds the sexual organs of a flower.
  • The Receptacle is the generally enlarged top of the footstalk, which supports the other parts of the flower. Some "fruits" are enlarged receptacles rather than ovaries.
  • Curved backward or downward
  • Abruptly bent or turned downward, or bent backward.
  • The area of the root where the enlarged root cells turn into the various root tissues.
  • The percentage of moisture saturating the air at a given temperature. The ratio of water vapor in the air to the amount of water the air could hold at the current temperature and pressure.
  • The ability of a host plant to prevent or reduce disease development by retarding multiplication of the pathogen within the host.
  • The process of burning sugars to use as energy for plant growth. The process by which carbohydrates are converted into energy. This energy builds new tissues, maintains the chemical processes, and allows growth within the plant.